Art Therapy Isn’t Just for Artists

Art therapy is a versatile therapeutic technique. It can help with depression, anxiety, and those who have experienced trauma. You don’t have to be an artist to benefit from art therapy. In this type of therapeutic technique, clients use painting, drawing, collage and other art forms to communicate their feelings.

It can be beneficial for people who have difficulty expressing their emotions with words. You don’t have to be an artist to benefit from this form of mental health treatment. Here is how art therapy can help a multitude of people.

Art therapy and children

When children see a pediatric therapist, they may want to open up, but it isn’t easy. That’s where art therapy can help. Many children love to draw, and they don’t think about being an artist. They want to express themselves creatively. Art therapists can encourage the child to illustrate how they feel or focus on a specific scenario. Children don’t think

about if their drawing is good or not; they enjoy the process of creating. And that’s an excellent analogy for art therapy. We can learn from how free children are when they create art. An art therapist asks the child about what they drew and how they feel in the drawing. 

Trauma and art therapy

It can be difficult to talk about traumatic experiences. Art can provide a medium to express what a person went through without saying it aloud. When words don’t come easily, art can communicate messages.

A person who has experienced severe trauma may have difficulty talking about what they went through, but they can write out their feelings in an artistic way. They can journal about their feelings or they draw a picture of what happened.

Art therapy is freeing because you don’t have to worry about whether what you created is “good enough.” You’re not there to impress anybody. The point of drawing and creating is to experience catharsis. You want to release pent-up emotions so that you can feel better. Trauma isn’t easy to talk about, but you can process it through the arts.

Communicating feelings with art 

Some people struggle with communication. That’s where our therapy can help. You don’t have to think about your feelings. Instead, you can draw or paint them. Whatever the medium you are using, there’s no right way to express your emotions via art. The wonderful thing about art therapy is you get to decide how you are expressing yourself. It’s not like verbal language. You don’t have to worry about grammar or syntax because there isn’t any of that in art. You pour out your feelings into whatever creative project you are working on, and your therapist asks you about your creation. It’s a unique form of emotional communication.

Art therapy help self-esteem

Art therapy can help a person with their self-esteem and self-image. When they’re able to communicate their feelings through art best, they will have a sense of confidence. Sometimes it’s not easy to express a person’s feelings, but when they have a creative outlet, they feel confident. They can learn to communicate their feelings using an artistic medium.

Learn more about art therapy

Art as therapy can be highly transformative. The arts are a perfect way to communicate complicated feelings. You don’t have to start by expressing your innermost trauma. You can let the artistic medium express how you feel. If you’re interested in pursuing our therapy, you can find a therapist online or in your local area.

Our therapy treats people who are children all the way up until adulthood. You’ll also see our therapy practiced in nursing homes. Something is relaxing about creating different forms of art. You might try our therapy if you were interested in learning ways to express your feelings, work through trauma, or cope with a mental health issue.

Marie Miguel has been a writing and research expert for nearly a decade, covering a variety of health-related topics. Currently, she is contributing to the expansion and growth of a free online mental health resource with BetterHelp.com. With an interest and dedication to addressing stigmas associated with mental health, she continues to specifically target subjects related to anxiety and depression.

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